Eastern White Bearded Gnu (Connochaetes taurinus albojubatus)

Images by Peter Moszynski

Estimates of Eastern White-bearded Wildebeest indicate a steep decline in the subspecies’ populations to a current level of perhaps 6,000-8,000 animals.


Of these we have up to 500 in NNP…


They usually stay in the Sheep and Goat Land between Athi River & Kitengela (outside the Park), but drought & incursions into this bit of short-grass habitat forces them into the (longer grassed) Park…


This is one of the many threatened species of large mammal which find sanctuary in NNP (the Browse rhino springs to mind)


Truly, these creatures, though existing elsewhere (Athi Kapiti, Shompole) will only have space to exist in the Nairobi Park in the future..


A sad fate for a perfectly adapted creature which (it is estimated) numbered 100,000 in the Athi Kapiti ecosystem (the plains around what is now Nairobi….)


The question is : will the Eastern gnu survive the SGR ?


Let’s hope for the best for these fab animals…



By Will da Beast

Fire in NNP

By Will Knocker:


A couple of weeks ago at the height of the drought I could see a huge fire in the Park from my home in the Silole Sanctuary…


Plumes of smoke drifting towards Wilson Airport


What the heck was going on?


My daughter Lucy & I decided to investigate…


Driving into the Park we could see that the plains above Olomanyi Dam were on fire..


Fire is scarey & one could only imagine what was happening in the several thousand acres of grassland now ablaze..


But fire is an absolute feature of the savannah & some of the grassland areas of the Park could do with a Controlled Burn to remove the tall, rank, inedible grass ….


A large part of the plains below the Langata forest (Narok Omom, meaning Black Head in Maa: mangled into the ‘Nangolomon’ known today) was burnt…


KWS were backburning & controlling the blaze on the verges of the tracks, which acted as windbreaks.

Luckily the wind had died down…


Within a few days, hungry zebra made thin by the recent drought, were in the Burn area, grazing on the fresh green shoots…


Within a few weeks & a downpour of rain from one of the localised storms which has been the norm so far these Short Rains & there were hundreds zebra, kongoni & gnus enjoying the new growth of grass, free from predators, on the clean short-grass plain….


Drought Stalks NNP

By Will Knocker:


Things are getting very dry in Nairobi National Park & several sources of water like this gravel pit are now dry: shouldn’t they be scooped out now, ready for the Rains?


Driving into the Mokoyeti valley gives the impression of a dessicated landscape…


The Acacia mellifera is in flower: it only does so when provoked by a dry period: food for bees & other insects…


This is a good time for the scavengers such as these vultures: NNP is a refuge for these Masters of the Skies…not a cloud to be seen


The large mammals such as the 150 or so Masai giraffe we have in the Park are hungry & wandering far in search of browse: they cannot go too far into the humanised world outside the Park: they are constrained…


A victim of drought, strangely untouched by scavengers…


Wildlife ,such as this tommy, stay close to sources of water (Empakasi river)


The wildebeest are giving birth in this unusually dry year: will the precious calves survive? Only a few thousand of this sub-species of gnu exists: about 500 of them in NNP


Nursery herd of Eastern white-bearded gnus


The Plains zebra are foaling too: it’s tough for the youngsters & their lactating mothers too..


The Athi dam is receding & a magnet for all forms of wildlife..


Like these thirsty zebras…


This old Grant’s gazelle will not survive this bitter season


But in the receding dams, new life emerges: White-faced whistling duck & ducklings


Aquatic birds like the splendid Saddle-billed stork look out of place on the dry plains…


Whilst impalas stay in the shade at mid-day


The dams are frequented by thirsty herds…


And the Empakasi river flows very slowly. We all await the Life-giving Rains…..

Great Gnews from NNP

Pictures by Alexandra Spyratos:


This is an Eastern White Bearded wildebeest, of which there are once estimated to have been 100,000 in the Athi-Kapiti Ecosystem of which Nairobi National Park is a part…

According to http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/5229/0

there were still 90,000 or so of this Kenyan sub-species of gnu in existence in the late 1990’s.

However, estimates of Eastern White-bearded Wildebeest indicate a steep decline in the subspecies’ populations to a current level of perhaps 6,000-8,000 animals. Apart from NNP, the other haven for this sub-species is the Shompole Conservancy.


For many years now, there have been about  250 individuals in the Park & the fast-dwindling dispersal area to the South.


It has been a dry year in Kajiado generally & especially in the  intensively grazed Sheep & Goat Land which these short-grass plain grazers like & many wildebeest have moved into the Park  with the rain of recent days.


The fantastic news is that the photographer & I counted 450 individuals, many of them young yearlings: the NNP population is INCREASING & will continue to do so in the future given the massive grazing pressure on the Park  nowadays: gone are the days when one had to consider burning the Park to manage the grazing: innumerable buffaloes, zebra, kongoni & cattle are seeing to that: the days of grass as a super-abundant resource are well & truly over…